Fossill Collection

Specimen Description:

Largest Mosasaur in Canada. Approximately 43 feet long.
CardID:
231
Last Modified:
2013-02-07 09:33:10
LastEditor:
Joseph Hatcher
Accession Num:
M.74.06.06
Prev Nums:
None
Department:
Vertebrate Paleontology
Collector:
Morden & District Museum
CollectionName:
Research
DateCollected:
1974-07-25 00:00:00
Remarks:
Information is based on the original paper catalogue of the Morden & District Museum (1992).
Qty:
1
QtyReplicates:
1
SpecimenDesc:
Largest Mosasaur in Canada. Approximately 43 feet long.
ReplicateLocation:
CFDC Exhibit Gallery
AcquisitionMode:
Quarry Collection
AccessionDate:
2008-02-28 00:00:00
CurrentOwner:
Province of Manitoba
DepositorName:
Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre
Credit:
Dr. Elizabeth L. Nicholls, Henry Isaak, Donald Bell, David Lumgair, Joseph Hatcher
tPhylum:
Chordata
tClass:
Reptilia
tOrder:
Lacertilia/Squamata
tFamily:
Mosasauridae
fGenus
Tylosaurus
tSubspecies:
pembinensis
tCommonName:
Mosasaur, Tylosaurus, "Bruce"
tRemarks:
Formally described as "Hainosaurus pembinensis" by Elizabeth Nicholls.
dUnits:
feet
dLength:
43
dCurrentCondition:
Excellent
dDate:
2009-11-12 00:00:00
dIdentifier:
Joseph Hatcher
dFeatures:
Largest Mosasaur from Canada
dSex:
Unknown
gGeoPeriod:
Cretaceous
gEpoch:
Campanian
gAge:
Late Cretaceous
gMa:
80 - 83
gFormation:
Pierre Shale
gMember:
Pembina
gHorizon:
Unknown
stPermLocBuilding:
Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre
stPermLocRoom:
Collections Room
stPermLocShelf:
S-14-2, 15-2, 16-2, 17-2, and 14-3
stPermLocDrawer:
D-0130???
stLocDate:
2008-02-28 00:00:00
stComponentLoc:
S-14-2, 15-2, 16-2, 17-2, and 14-3 58 Vertebrae, 1 Jaw Element & one hand flipper on display
stStatus:
stored
oContinent:
North America
oCountry:
Canada
oOcean:
Western Interior Seaway
oProvince:
Manitoba
oLocation:
Manitoba Escarpment
oMineQuarry:
06
cDateCatalogued:
2008-02-28 00:00:00
Cataloguer:
Joseph Hatcher
CatRemarks:
Humerus and 1 Vertebra were moved from Drawer 104 onto Shelf 15-2.
References:
NICHOLLS, E.L. 1988. Marine Vertebrates of the Pembina Member of the Pierre Shale (Campanian, Upper Cretaceous) of Manitoba and their Significance to the Biogeography of the Western Interior Seaway. University of Calgary, pp. ii-317.
Publications:
NICHOLLS, E.L. 1988. Marine Vertebrates of the Pembina Member of the Pierre Shale (Campanian, Upper Cretaceous) of Manitoba and their Significance to the Biogeography of the Western Interior Seaway. University of Calgary, pp. ii-317. NICHOLLS, E.L. 1988. The First Record of the Mosasaur Hainosaurus (Reptilia: Lacertilia) from North America. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Volume 25 Number 10, pp. 1564 - 1570. BULLARD, T.S. and CALDWELL, M.W. 2007. The Anatomy and Systematics of Tylosaurine Mosasaurs. Abstract Booklet, Second Mosasaur Meeting, Sternberg Museum of Natural History, Hays, Kansas. p. 9. ELLIS. R. 2003. Sea Dragons. Predators of the Prehistoric Oceans. University Press of Kansas, p. 230. BULLARD, T.S. 2006. Anatomy and Systematics of North American Tylosaurine Mosasaurs. Master of Science Thesis, University of Alberta, pp. 1-208. Hatcher, J. 2009. Palaeotaxonomy of the Pierre Shale Formation in Southern Manitoba. Abstracts Volume, Thirteenth Annual Alberta Palaeontology Symposium, pp.16-20, Mouint Royal College, Calgary. BULLARD, T.S., and M.W. CALDWELL. 2010. Redescription and rediagnosis ofthe tylosaurine mosasaur Hainosaurus pembinensis Nicholls, 1988, as Tylosaurus pembinensis (Nicholls, 1988). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 30(2): 416-426.
sQuarryNum:
06
sSiteName:
Lumgair North
sMapReference:
NW 1/4 Sec. 20-T3-R6
sGPS:
N 49º 13.671' W 98º 14.565'
sArea:
West of existing fence line
sElevation:
1,296 feet
sSiteMap:
unknown
sNotes:
*- Accordng to the landowner, Mr. David Lumgair (who had a first hand account of the excavation in 1974), the actual fossil bearing layer of M.74.06.06 was approximately 15 feet below the current soil elevation. This would make the stratigraphic occurance of M.74.06.06 at 1, 281 feet. The Site is situatited on a Westward-Facing Slope, and also according to Mr. Lumgair, the fossil was located in the uppermost bentonite layers of the Pembina Member, and the excavation spanned an area of approximately 100 feet by 100 feet.
imageID:
3086
DateTaken:
2010-12-09
Classification:
specimen
Photographer:
Alexandra Grey
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